Food Sovereignty: Talking About Hope and Health

In the case of indigenous populations, they’re also reclaiming cultural practices that were disrupted by colonial interventions.

Food. Tradition. Culture. Health. For American Indians, traditional diets of “First Foods” are being restored through food sovereignty programs. Simply, when people take control of their own food supplies, they gain better nutrition and food security. In the case of indigenous populations, they’re also reclaiming cultural practices that were disrupted by colonial interventions such as boarding schools and relocations.

Food Sovereignty in Indigenous Populations

Communication is the key to success

So here’s my request: If you, or somebody you know, have any words of wisdom about community outreach and food security, please email: nancyvanleuven@gmail.com. I’m part of next week’s Food Sovereignty Summit , a sustainability collaboration headed by the Oneida Nation, First Nations Development Institute, Intertribal Agriculture Council, and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College. And a primary focus is how to better communication about issues such as increasing access to fresh and healthy foods, branding and marketing products, and collaborating to buy Indian.

My goal: To create a toolbox of communication materials for any grassroots food group redefining their own local food systems. Have any suggestions? Want to partner?

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